Interview with Amanda Briggs

by | Feb 10, 2019 | Alex Harbich, blog, Interviews, Neuigkeiten

GM: Dear Amanda, thank you for this interview. We start with a localization: where are you from?

Amanda: I was born and raised in South Metro Atlanta. I live here until today.

GM: What do you see?

Amanda: Everything! I am a very quiet, introverted person but I see and watch everything …

GM: You are a master of abstraction. How would you describe your style?

Mental imagery can and will greatly impact one’s perception. And so my style derives from my imagination coupled with color field painting where “color is freed from objective context and becomes the subject in itself.”(Greenburg, Clement. Art and Culture, Beacon Press, 1961) and fine-art photography.

As Ellsworth Kelly famously said “The most pleasurable thing in the world, for me,

is to see something and then translate how I see it.” I can not express it better.
GM: You already mentioned some artists. Would you call her your role model?

I have great respect for all kinds of artists, but I think the one I connect with or who I enjoy the most is Ellsworth Kelly. I think he’s quite brilliant. And then there’s Rothko. Mondrian is another great one. But one in particular that I love on a much different level, not really as a role model, and that’s Ms Amy Winehouse. Her timing and phrasing was impeccable, her voice stunned. She had immense talent.

GM: I love Amy Winehouse! 🙂 Which of your own artwork is your favorite and why?

Amanda: This is tough! I’ve come to really love the piece that is three shades of blue (untitled). The color itself works its way around the lines, forming shapes that are freestanding and full of clarity. It’s very demanding,strong, and to the point.

GM: What does minimal photography mean to you?

Minimal photography, for me, is taking something I’ve seen and stripping it down to it’s very core, ignoring all reality until the idea becomes clear and understood. I do this through the use of lines, color, light, form and space. Negative space being just as important as positive space. They all play a vital role and must work together while also commanding their own attention or independence.
If I give you too much to look at, the idea becomes muddied and lost, and so then the mind wanders missing the point entirely.

One of the great things about minimalism is that we may see and express it differently, but if the idea is well thought out and concrete, standing loud and proud… well then I say, well done.

GM: That is beautiful. Is there something we should absolutely tell our guests about you?

I think the relationship between artist and viewer is very important. I hope it’s evident that my work is purely about the concept of minimalism. It’s up to the viewer to accept it willingly and expand upon it.

GM: Thank you very much Amanda!

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